Poll: What religions are you?

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Thread: What Is Your Religion ?

  1. #151
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maryam9 View Post
    az che lahaaz?


    You should View/observe Poll Results .




  2. #152
    Member Dokhtar Bandari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maryam9 View Post
    I disagree

    I think that the same way how religion should not be forced on people (eg for people who believe in God to criticise those who dont believe in God), atheists or people who dont believe in religion shouldnt criticise those who believe in a religion or God.
    Maryam jaan, with all due respect and no pun intended I think you got things a little mixed up here.
    Let me say the followings first:
    Atheist: Believes in non existence of God.
    Secular: Believes that existed but may be he is dead or has left us for good.So whats the use of religion.
    Agnostic: Believes that God exist but it can not be known so why bother..

    These are not complete explanations, but they should tell u what each "lable" represents. So just because u don't believe in an organized religion doesn't mean that u don't believe in God.

    God lives in ur heart and soul however u want to express it...go to it. Funny thing is that God never gets offended but its creatures do.
    I would be true, for there are those who trust me;
    I would be pure, for there are those who care;
    I would be strong, for there is much to suffer;
    I would be brave, for there is much to dare.
    I would be friend of all—the foe—the friendless;
    I would be giving and forget the gift;
    I would be humble, for I know my weakness;
    I would look up and laugh—and love—and lift.
    Howard Walter
    http://www.farsinet.com/poetry/images/poemvatn.gif

  3. #153
    my ancestors were zarthoshts but i am muslim shia

  4. #154
    Member Dokhtar Bandari's Avatar
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    LOOOOOOOOL...you crack me up dude. I think u have made urself pretty obvious in here as what u are.
    Be that its may, are u telling me that you joined the religion that raped, killed and destroyed your ancestors???? Wow..amazing...Good luck in achieving higher planes of existence to God.



    Quote Originally Posted by IranianGuards View Post
    my ancestors were zarthoshts but i am muslim shia
    I would be true, for there are those who trust me;
    I would be pure, for there are those who care;
    I would be strong, for there is much to suffer;
    I would be brave, for there is much to dare.
    I would be friend of all—the foe—the friendless;
    I would be giving and forget the gift;
    I would be humble, for I know my weakness;
    I would look up and laugh—and love—and lift.
    Howard Walter
    http://www.farsinet.com/poetry/images/poemvatn.gif

  5. #155
    Member maryam9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dokhtar Bandari View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by maryam9
    I disagree

    I think that the same way how religion should not be forced on people (eg for people who believe in God to criticise those who dont believe in God), atheists or people who dont believe in religion shouldnt criticise those who believe in a religion or God.
    Maryam jaan, with all due respect and no pun intended I think you got things a little mixed up here.
    Let me say the followings first:
    Atheist: Believes in non existence of God.
    Secular: Believes that existed but may be he is dead or has left us for good.So whats the use of religion.
    Agnostic: Believes that God exist but it can not be known so why bother..

    These are not complete explanations, but they should tell u what each "lable" represents. So just because u don't believe in an organized religion doesn't mean that u don't believe in God.

    God lives in ur heart and soul however u want to express it...go to it. Funny thing is that God never gets offended but its creatures do.
    Thanks Dokhtar Bandari for the definitions, but that wasnt what I was commenting on when I said that I disagree.

    What I meant was that both of these things are bad:

    1, for theists to criticise atheists
    example: mr X is going to hell because he doesnt believe in xxx

    2, for others to criticise those who have a belief in something.
    example:
    Quote Originally Posted by reza1st
    To me, lack of self confidence along with weakness of humankind brings about religion.
    Quote Originally Posted by reza1st
    If there exists a god hopefully it’s greater and better than the so called god who sent Koran, Bible, … that are full of flaws!
    Thats why i said "I disagree" when you commented on his whole post and said "bravo".

    my point: neither group should insist that they are right and the other person is wrong.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dokhtar Bandari
    God lives in ur heart and soul however u want to express it...go to it. Funny thing is that God never gets offended but its creatures do.
    very true. Religion should not be the cause of disunity.
    Last edited by maryam9; 01-16-2008 at 02:35 AM.
    Mary's back, back again

  6. #156
    Quote Originally Posted by Dokhtar Bandari View Post
    are u telling me that you joined the religion that raped, killed and destroyed your ancestors???? Wow..amazing...Good luck in achieving higher planes of existence to God.
    wrong wrong and wrong!
    eslam does not promote that
    Last edited by Rasputin; 01-18-2008 at 10:23 AM.

  7. #157
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    Religion Gone Bad: The Hidden Dangers of the Christian Right By Mel White

    By Mel White

    Published 2006

    J.P. Tarcher/Penguin

    Evangelicalism

    367 pages

    ISBN 1585425311



    ---
    The bestselling author of "Stranger at the Gate" provides an inside expos of the Christian Right's agenda-and a playbook in how to resist it.



    This Fall's midterm elections will see much discussion about the enhanced power of the Christian fundamentalist Right, leaving many people to wonder: just who are these people and what exactly do they want?

    What are their ultimate goals? The Reverend Mel White, a deeply religious man who sees fundamentalism as "evangelical Christian orthodoxy gone cultic," believes that it is not a stretch to say that the true goal of today's fundamentalists is to break down the wall that separates church and state, superimpose their "moral values" on the U.S. Constitution, replace democracy with theocratic rule, and ultimately create a new "Christian America" in their image.

    White's new book, Religion Gone Bad, is a wake-up call to all of us to take heed. White is singularly qualified to write this expos of the Christian Right because he himself was a true believer who served the evangelical movement as pastor, professor, filmmaker, television producer, author, and ghostwriter for such fundamentalist leaders as Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, and Billy Graham, all of whom he got to know well. As he writes, "These are not just Neocons dressed in religious drag. These men see themselves as gurus called by God to rescue America from unrighteousness. They believe this is a Christian nation that must be returned forcibly to its Christian roots."

    He is also a gay man, who made news when he came out more than twelve years ago. White has gained a unique understanding of the fundamentalist agenda because, since the fall of "godless Communism," homosexuality and abortionhave become the primary targets through which fundamentalists have created fear, raised money, and mobilized recruits. Religion Gone Bad documents the thirty-year war that fundamentalist Christians have waged against homosexuality and gays and lesbians and offers dramatic, heartbreaking evidence that fundamentalist leaders-Protestant and Catholic alike-are waging nothing less than a "holy war" (jihad) against sexual minorities.

    By focusing on the current plight of gay people in this country, White addresses the wider issue that fundamentalist Christianity-like fundamentalist Islam-has become a threat not just to gays, but to all Americans who disagree with fundamentalist Christian "values."




  8. #158
    Member indian_blues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IranianGuards View Post
    wrong wrong and wrong!
    eslam does not promote that
    True, I firmly believe in it.
    “I want to feel passion, I want to feel pain. I want to weep at the sound of your name. Come make me laugh, come make me cry... just make me feel alive.”

    If you wish to be loved, show more of your faults than your virtues. - Edward Bulwer-Lytton


    http://www.foriegnmoviesddl.com

  9. #159
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    WASHINGTON (AFP) - A huge survey of the world's Muslims released Tuesday challenges Western notions that equate Islam with radicalism and violence.

    The survey, conducted by the Gallup polling agency over six years and three continents, seeks to dispel the belief held by some in the West that Islam itself is the driving force of radicalism.

    It shows that the overwhelming majority of Muslims condemned the attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001 and other subsequent terrorist attacks, the authors of the study said in Washington.

    "Samuel Harris said in the Washington Times (in 2004): 'It is time we admitted that we are not at war with terrorism. We are at war with Islam'," Dalia Mogadeh, co-author of the book "Who Speaks for Islam" which grew out of the study, told a news conference here.

    "The argument Mr Harris makes is that religion in the primary driver" of radicalism and violence, she said.

    "Religion is an important part of life for the overwhelming majority of Muslims, and if it were indeed the driver for radicalisation, this would be a serious issue."

    But the study, which Gallup says surveyed a sample equivalent to 90 percent of the world's Muslims, showed that widespread religiosity "does not translate into widespread support for terrorism," said Mogadeh, director of the Gallup Center for Muslim Studies.

    About 93 percent of the world's 1.3 billion Muslims are moderates and only seven percent are politically radical, according to the poll, based on more than 50,000 interviews.

    In majority Muslim countries, overwhelming majorities said religion was a very important part of their lives -- 99 percent in Indonesia, 98 percent in Egypt, 95 percent in Pakistan.

    But only seven percent of the billion Muslims surveyed -- the radicals -- condoned the attacks on the United States in 2001, the poll showed.

    Moderate Muslims interviewed for the poll condemned the 9/11 attacks on New York and Washington because innocent lives were lost and civilians killed.

    "Some actually cited religious justifications for why they were against 9/11, going as far as to quote from the Koran -- for example, the verse that says taking one innocent life is like killing all humanity," she said.

    Meanwhile, radical Muslims gave political, not religious, reasons for condoning the attacks, the poll showed.

    The survey shows radicals to be neither more religious than their moderate counterparts, nor products of abject poverty or refugee camps.

    "The radicals are better educated, have better jobs, and are more hopeful with regard to the future than mainstream Muslims," John Esposito, who co-authored "Who Speaks for Islam", said.

    "Ironically, they believe in democracy even more than many of the mainstream moderates do, but they're more cynical about whether they'll ever get it," said Esposito, a professor of Islamic studies at Georgetown University in Washington.

    Gallup launched the study following 9/11, after which US President George W. Bush asked in a speech, which is quoted in the book: "Why do they hate us?"

    "They hate... a democratically elected government," Bush offered as a reason.

    "They hate our freedoms -- our freedom of religion, our freedom of speech, our freedom to vote and assemble and disagree with each other."

    But the poll, which gives ordinary Muslims a voice in the global debate that they have been drawn into by 9/11, showed that most Muslims -- including radicals -- admire the West for its democracy, freedoms and technological prowess.

    What they do not want is to have Western ways forced on them, it said.

    "Muslims want self-determination, but not an American-imposed and -defined democracy. They don't want secularism or theocracy. What the majority wants is democracy with religious values," said Esposito.

    The poll has given voice to Islam's silent majority, said Mogahed.

    "A billion Muslims should be the ones that we look to, to understand what they believe, rather than a vocal minority," she told AFP.

    Muslims in 40 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Middle East were interviewed for the survey, which is part of Gallup's World Poll that aims to interview 95 percent of the world's population.




  10. #160
    Member Dokhtar Bandari's Avatar
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    statistics show that statistics are bunch of bull crap...lol
    I would be true, for there are those who trust me;
    I would be pure, for there are those who care;
    I would be strong, for there is much to suffer;
    I would be brave, for there is much to dare.
    I would be friend of all—the foe—the friendless;
    I would be giving and forget the gift;
    I would be humble, for I know my weakness;
    I would look up and laugh—and love—and lift.
    Howard Walter
    http://www.farsinet.com/poetry/images/poemvatn.gif

  11. #161
    Newbie PURIA's Avatar
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    salam behameye azizane gol... dorood bar shoma

    man has panama hastam salam be hameye shoma , bebashin jub farsi nimidunam .

    has 1 sal birune iran jastam .


    jodafes hameye shoma


    puria.

  12. #162
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)




  13. #163
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    AishCafe's flashy Web presence makes it look more like a gambling site than the religious experience it is.

    There are interactive animations, clickable icons and even a mock iPhone to lure in Jewish college students. And, like gambling, it could pay to play.

    The site, run by Aish HaTorah, an Orthodox Jewish educational network based in Israel, offers students willing to learn about their faith a payout of up to $250 or a $300 subsidy for a trip to Israel.

    AishCafe has shelled out some $300,000 to students since it launched a year and a half ago. Supporters see the approach as an effective way to reach young Jews at a time when a dwindling number have strong ties to their religious roots and community.

    "There's a sense today that college students are very busy with their schedules and their lives, and in order for them to take time out, they need to be incentivized," said Rabbi Raphael Shore, the program's director. "It's the same way colleges offer scholarships."

    But some Jewish leaders are concerned that paying students to take the courses sends the wrong message.

    "If you believe that Judaism is a viable religion for many different reasons — and you're able to show it in a way that's truly meaningful — that's truly exciting," said David Katznelson, who organizes innovative religious and arts celebrations in San Francisco that attract many young Jews. "And I don't think you need to pay people to do that."

    His battle-tested advice? "Host something interesting and they will come."

    Jewish leaders have been struggling for years to reverse the decline in religious observance among young people and stem the high-rate of intermarriage. Offering incentives to learn has become somewhat accepted, partly because of the popularity of the Birthright Israel program.

    Since it started eight years ago, Birthright has sent 170,000 Jewish students on free 10-day trips to Israel. Participants must be Jewish, between the ages of 18 and 26, and must have never been to Israel on a similar group trip. Nothing is required of the participants in return.

    By contrast, AishCafe puts students through a gantlet of tests on Jewish rituals and history, featuring a dozen classes with catchy titles like "Genesis and the Big Bang" and "Pleasure 101," each offering its own edgy take on Jewish rituals, morals and ideology.

    The program isn't easy. Participants must watch seven hourlong films, listen to three audio programs and complete two live, in-person classes with a rabbi. Each includes a separate reading and a test. Students only get a full $250 payment if they score high grades.

    AishCafe also offers students a separate class called "Positive Psychology and Judaism" by Tal Ben-Shahar, a popular lecturer at Harvard University. The course costs $549 but can reward participants with three college credits.

    So far, organizers say most of the 1,500 students who have participated in the classes have fared well. More than 90 percent of students pass their tests, and 97 percent would recommend the course to a friend, Shore said.

    "We simply want to try to introduce young Jews who haven't had the opportunity to learn about Judaism," Shore said. "They go to university and might be well versed about science, mathematics and literature, but their Jewish education may be very fragile."

    Karina Grabovsky, now 24, was 6 when she emigrated from the Ukraine to Indianapolis, and in the U.S. she learned little about her Jewish identity.

    "AishCafe was kind of the beginning of wanting to know more about Judaism and really identify with my Judaic roots," Grabovsky said.

    She said he would have participated even without the payment — a $300 stipend that went toward a trip to Israel.

    "To me, it was an avenue for religious growth. That was something I wanted to do for a while, and this was an opportunity to do it."

    Jonathan Young, a student at York University in Toronto who works part-time at a liquor store to pay for college, admits feeling uneasy about taking money to learn about his religion.

    The son of a Christian father and a Jewish mother — he calls his family a "Chrismukkah household" — he was eager to learn more about his Hebrew roots. He also received the $300 Israel stipend, but what he discovered was a deep longing to learn more about Judaism, he said.

    "I really felt I had something I could relate to," said Young, 21. "For me and for a lot of people, there's a sense that religion can be backwards, but this shows it in another light.

    "And," he added, "the money doesn't hurt."




  14. #164
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    'مسلمانان بریتانیا فکر می کنند قربانی هستند'


    صدیق خان گفت مسلمانان باید به فکر حل مشکلاتی مانند تبعیض جنسیتی، ندانستن زبان انگلیسی و ازدواج های اجباری در میان جوامع مسلمان بریتانیا باشند
    صدیق خان، وزیر مشاور در دولت کارگری بریتانیا، از مسلمانان این کشور خواسته است مسئولانه تر با مسائل روز بریتانیا برخورد کنند و فکر نکنند که به گفته او "قربانی" هستند.
    آقای خان در گزارشی برای موسسه تحقیقاتی "انجمن فابین"، گفته است که بسیاری از مسلمانان بیشتر از آنکه نگران مشکلات داخلی بریتانیا باشند، نگران سیاست خارجی این کشور هستند.

    او گفت مسلمانان باید به فکر حل مشکلاتی مانند تبعیض جنسیتی، ندانستن زبان انگلیسی و ازدواج های اجباری در میان جوامع مسلمان بریتانیا باشند.

    آقای خان، که یکی از چهار نماینده مسلمان در پارلمان بریتانیاست، گفت مسلمانان بریتانیایی که نمی توانند به زبان انگلیسی صبحت کنند باید این زبان را یاد بگیرند چون ندانستن زبان انگلیسی مانع دستیابی آنها به مهارت هایی می شود که برای یافتن کار مناسب ضروری است.

    او افزود ندانستن زبان همچنین باعث کم شدن اعتماد به نفس مسلمانان بریتانیایی و همچنین مانع از استفاده بهتر از امکانات درمانی این کشور می شود.

    این عضو پارلمان بریتانیا همچنین از همه مساجد این کشور خواست به زنان اجازه ورود بدهند و از جوامع مسلمان بریتانیا خواست ازدواج اجباری و قتل ناموسی را محکوم کنند.

    اما او همچنین حزب حاکم کارگر را متهم کرد که ارتباطش با مسلمانان بریتانیا غیرمتعهدانه است.

    "بنیاد رمضان"، از سازمان های جوانان مسلمان بریتانیا، گفت که آقای خان با درد مسلمانان عادی آشنا نیست.

    "انصاف، نه لطف"

    صدیق خان، در گزارش خود با عنوان "انصاف، نه لطف"، آورده است: "ما باید در قبال خانواده های خود مسئولانه تر رفتار کنیم، به آنهایی که می گویند علیه مسلمانان توطئه شده بی اعتنا باشیم و از همه مهمتر لازم است که ما تفکر قربانی بودن را کنار بگذاریم."

    او در گزارش خود افزوده است: "ما باید همگی بپذیریم که قتل ناموسی، قتل نفس است و ازدواج اجباری، آدم ربایی است. این سنت ها جایی نه در این کشور دارد و نه در جای دیگر."

    این نماینده پارلمان بریتانیا همچنین ادعا کرده که مسلمانان این کشور با نگرانی در مورد سیاست خارجی بریتانیا دل مشغولند و به مشکلات سیاسی هر روزه در بریتانیا کمتر توجه می کنند.

    صدیق خان گفت: "مسلمانان باید درک کنند که سیاست بریتانیا در قبال حقوق کودکان بریتانیایی به مهمی مناقشه بر سر کشمیر است."

    محمد شفیق، مدیر اجرایی بنیاد رمضان گفت که "مشکل اصلی" که مسلمانان را عقب نگه داشته "فقر، جرم و جنایت، نژادپرستی و اسلام ستیزی است."

    او افزود: "ذهنیت ما این نیست که قربانی هستیم بلکه ما فکر می کنیم که قربانی ناکامی دولت بریتانیا در مقابله با مشکلات واقعی مانند فقر و همچنین مقابله با دلیل اصلی تروریسم در این کشور شده ایم."

    او گفت که بنیاد رمضان پیشینه ای طولانی در مبارزه با ازدواج اجباری و قتل ناموسی دارد.

    آقای شفیق همچین گفت که میان نگرانی درباره سرنوشت مسلمانان در خارج از بریتانیا و آگاهی در مورد مشکلات سیاسی داخل این کشور تناقضی وجود ندارد.




  15. #165
    Senior Member abadani69's Avatar
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    You dont have the Option of KAFAR, why not REDWINE?WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYY??????????? Chera religion e khodeto nazashtiiiiiiiiii KAFARRRRRRR?

  16. #166
    Member DokhtarIrooni's Avatar
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    i dont have a religion, i just believe in god. I dont believe that you need a religion to set some rules for you so you can live well. I've have my own rules

  17. #167
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    پژوهشگران در عرصه تاریخ هنر برای اولین بار دریافته اند که در تابلوی "شام آخر" اثر لئوناردو داوینچی، که یکی از معروف ترین آثار هنری جهان به شمار می رود، مسیح و حواریون مشغول صرف چه غذایی بوده اند.
    تردیدی در تاثیرگذاری شاهکار لئوناردو داوینچی نیست، که لحظه ای را به تصویر می کشد که در آن مسیح، حواریون، نزدیکترین طرفداران خود را آگاه می سازد که یکی از آنها قصد خیانت به او را دارد.

    شاید به این دلیل تعجب برانگیز نباشد که هیچکدام از حضار در تابلو چندان جذب غذای موجود در سفره نشده اند و تعداد اندکی از هزاران شیفته هنر که در طی قرون مختلف به بررسی این اثر پرداخته اند، به این غذا دقت کرده اند.

    کسانی که به این مسئله دقت کردند فرض را بر این گذاشتند که میهمانان مشغول صرف بره بریان بوده اند، که همانند نان و شراب نقاشی شده در اثر، به نماد معنایی مسیحیت ارتدوکس اشاره دارد که مسیح را با بره ای قربانی شده بخاطر گناهان انسان متناظر می داند.

    سرعت بالای زوال این اثر که در سال 1498 میلادی کامل شد، بررسی دقیق این موضوع را ناممکن ساخت؛ اما اکنون به لطف تازه ترین روش بازسازی نقاشی های دیواری کارشناسان هنر بالاخره توانسته اند به بررسی دقیق جزئیات غذای روی میز بپردازند.

    نتایج این بررسی که در نشریه گاسترونومیکا منتشر شده نشان می دهد که در سفره بره ای وجود نداشته، بلکه غذای طبخ شده مارماهی در کنار برش هایی از پرتقال بوده است.

    نکته مهم این است که همزمان با کار لئوناردو داوینچی بر روی "شام آخر"، این غذا، غذایی رایج بوده است.

    آنطور که جان واریانو، کارشناس تاریخ هنر می گوید نه تنها در دوره رنسانس در ایتالیا مارماهی غذایی رایج بوده، بلکه احتمالا لئوناردو داوینچی هم به آن علاقه ویژه ای داشته است، زیرا در فهرست های خریدی که در میان نوشته ها و آثار او برجای مانده این قلم غذایی نیز دیده می شود.





  18. #168
    Senior Member Rasputin's Avatar
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    امام جمعه تبريز: مجالس مذهبي زنانه مركز اشاعه خرافات

    "مجالس مذهبي بانوان مراكز ساختن خرافات است." اين مطلب را شبستري امام جمعه تبريز درمراسم آغاز سال تحصيلي حوزه علميه صادقيه تبريز، خطاب به طلاب زن ايراد كرد.

    خبرگزاري شبستان با انتشار اين خبر مي افزايد كه شبستري از طلاب زن خواسته است تا آموزش هاي ديني را تمام و كمال بياموزند و اشاعه دهند. چرا كه: "متأسفانه عده اي بي سواد در مجالس مذهبي بانوان حضور يافته و به خرافه گري و موعظه مي پردازند."

    لازم به ذكر است كه در سال جاري در حوزه علميه صادقيه تبريز 250 طلبه ي زن در سه سطح مختلف تحصيل مي كنند.






  19. #169
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    [quote=RedWine;157852]70% iranihayeh mosalmoon injurian ! kasi vaght nadareh,islam is a hard religion and havin too much rules ! banabar in taghsiri nadari to ![quote]
    Last edited by Rasputin; 11-01-2008 at 04:55 PM.

  20. #170
    Member maryam9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedWine View Post
    When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)
    I dont agree with this quote 100%

    People come up with quotes like these because they are fed up of people forcing religion onto them. Religion is a private thing, but unfortunately you still get Mullah’s or whoever trying to force religious rules. That is wrong.

    We cant say “I do what I feel like” (like in the quote).
    Everyone is different. What might appear "okay" to one person could be totally unnaceptable to another person. Everyone has their own morals or code of ethics.
    For example, a burglar will smash your window, break into your house and steal your TV. His justification for this action can be: "I haven't done anything bad. Why should a foreigner who does not belong in this country have more money than me and have a more expensive TV than me (someone who is white)..." And in his eyes, this burglar honestly believes that he has not done anything wrong.

    We should not be afraid of saying “Yes, we as human beings are weak and we need rules”. Why is it something to be shameful of? So what?! That is not the problem. The problem is when a human being expects another human being to justify their actions to them. This is what is wrong. We only have to answer to one person: God (& noone else!).

    Bla bla bla
    Last edited by maryam9; 11-04-2008 at 12:59 PM.

  21. #171
    Senior Member abadani69's Avatar
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    Cheghadr bahai inja darim vo khabar nadashtim Mashalla. Harja mire adam bahai jolosh sabz mishe Khoda ziad kone dokhtarashoono loooooooool. Har ki bahai mikhad biyad Arizona, onjai ke az iran farar kardan omadan USA hamashoon Arizona hastan 13, 000 Bahai in Arizona out of 18,000 Persians

  22. #172
    Member DokhtarIrooni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maryam9 View Post
    I dont agree with this quote 100%

    People come up with quotes like these because they are fed up of people forcing religion onto them. Religion is a private thing, but unfortunately you still get Mullah’s or whoever trying to force religious rules. That is wrong.

    We cant say “I do what I feel like” (like in the quote).
    Everyone is different. What might appear "okay" to one person could be totally unnaceptable to another person. Everyone has their own morals or code of ethics.
    For example, a burglar will smash your window, break into your house and steal your TV. His justification for this action can be: "I haven't done anything bad. Why should a foreigner who does not belong in this country have more money than me and have a more expensive TV than me (someone who is white)..." And in his eyes, this burglar honestly believes that he has not done anything wrong.

    We should not be afraid of saying “Yes, we as human beings are weak and we need rules”. Why is it something to be shameful of? So what?! That is not the problem. The problem is when a human being expects another human being to justify their actions to them. This is what is wrong. We only have to answer to one person: God (& noone else!).

    Bla bla bla

    i disagree with you, but i agree with the quote redwine posted

    Religions were probably "invented" by human beings just like you and me, so why should their rules be any better, than the rules we can set for our selves. After so many years through our evolution I really think we are alot more clever than "them" (prophets). So i understand why some people dont need those rules, because there is no person more sensible than yourself.

    Your example about the burglar was not so good because the burglar is doing something illegal and hurting another person so of course its not okay.

    And to answer the last part you wrote: Many people dont believe in god

  23. #173
    Member maryam9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DokhtarIrooni View Post
    i disagree with you, but i agree with the quote redwine posted
    to make myself perfectly clear: I agree with RedWines quote but only upto a certain point.
    Quote Originally Posted by DokhtarIrooni View Post
    Religions were probably "invented" by human beings just like you and me, so why should their rules be any better, than the rules we can set for our selves. After so many years through our evolution I really think we are alot more clever than "them" (prophets). So i understand why some people dont need those rules, because there is no person more sensible than yourself.
    i dont mind giving my own personal replies but i dont think its a good idea.
    Its different when you talk to someone, but when you type something it is very easy for the other person to mis-interpret the way a sentence was originally intended. i hate "bahs"!
    Quote Originally Posted by DokhtarIrooni View Post
    Your example about the burglar was not so good because the burglar is doing something illegal and hurting another person so of course its not okay.

    And to answer the last part you wrote: Many people dont believe in god
    Yeah, i know there are loads of atheists/agnostics. I actually did type a lot in my original post but then deleted it because i didnt want to make my post really long...

    People dont respect other people's personal space, which is:
    • if you do believe in God, khosh bahalet :P dont argue and say "you're going to hell"
    • if you dont believe in God, khosh bahalet :P ...dont argue and say "religion is stupid" or "Jesus wasnt real", etc


    p.s. i bet zubin will be back soon

    Arman: bahais are everywhere
    Last edited by maryam9; 11-04-2008 at 04:42 PM.

  24. #174
    Member maryam9's Avatar
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    I have put all my replies in one post so it is easier to read.
    Merci
    Last edited by Rasputin; 03-24-2009 at 05:39 PM.

  25. #175
    Senior Member abadani69's Avatar
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    NA DIGE SHOMA SHOOORESHO VAGHEAN DAR OVORDID. BEZARID MAN HAM NAZAR BEDAM LOTFAN:

    KHODA YEKI YAARE YEKI DEL YEKI DELDAR YEKI.

    VA SALAM NAMEH TAMAM. STOP ARGUING MARYAMMMM. ZUBIN HAM BIYADESH HAMIN HARFO MIZANE. CHEGHADR TU JAR VO BAHS MIKONI SHIRAZIIIII

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